Movie News

'Curse of La Llorona' Looks to Lead Calm Weekend before the 'Avengers' Storm

'Curse of La Llorona' Looks to Lead Calm Weekend before the 'Avengers' Storm
Following a strong performance in March, the domestic box office has slowed throughout the early part of April and this weekend won't be much different. Of course, just like last April saw Avengers: Infinity War close out the month, this April will conclude with the highly anticipated release of Avengers: Endgame, and studios are making way for the release by saving any major releases for the weeks following Endgame's debut. As for this week's newcomers, we're seeing several titles made for specifically targeted audiences such as Wednesday's debuts of Breakthrough and Disneynature's Penguins along with tomorrow's launch of The Curse of La Llorona. Warner Bros. and New Line are looking at their third straight weekend with the #1 film, this time around with the horror release, The Curse of La Llorona, debuting in 3,372 locations. While not specifically billed as a new entry in the Conjuring franchise, La Llorona does co-star
See full article at Box Office Mojo »

Clint Eastwood May Direct ‘The Ballad of Richard Jewell’

  • Variety
Clint Eastwood May Direct ‘The Ballad of Richard Jewell’
Clint Eastwood may direct “The Ballad of Richard Jewell,” a look at a security guard whose life gets turned upside down after media reports identified him as a possible suspect in the 1996 Atlanta Olympics bombing.

The film is currently set up at Disney/Fox and could reunite Eastwood with Alan Horn, the current Disney Studios chief who worked with the filmmaker when he was in charge of Warner Bros. motion picture division. Jonah Hill and Leonardo DiCaprio had originally been attached to star, but they will no longer appear in the movie. Their involvement will be limited to producing the film.

Eastwood’s involvement could change. He circled the project several years ago before opting to direct “Sully” with Tom Hanks. “O.J.: Made in America” director Ezra Edelman was last person to consider the project.

Eastwood had a box office success with last year’s drug runner drama “The Mule,
See full article at Variety »

Alex Ross Perry to Write and Direct Film Adaptation of Stephen King’s ‘Rest Stop’ for Legendary

  • The Wrap
Alex Ross Perry to Write and Direct Film Adaptation of Stephen King’s ‘Rest Stop’ for Legendary
Alex Ross Perry will write and direct the film adaptation of Stephen King’s “Rest Stop” for Legendary, the distributor announced on Thursday.

Craig Flores will produce through his Bread & Circuses banner, while Alex Garcia and Ali Mendes will oversee for Legendary.

More to come…

Read original story Alex Ross Perry to Write and Direct Film Adaptation of Stephen King’s ‘Rest Stop’ for Legendary At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Tessa Thompson thinks 'Thor 4' has been pitched to Marvel

Tessa Thompson thinks 'Thor 4' has been pitched to Marvel
Tessa Thompson, one of the stars of Thor: Ragnarok, says that Thor 4, directed by Taika Waititi, has been pitched.

Thor might not have gotten off to the most blockbuster start but the franchise’s latest effort, Thor Ragnarok, certainly captured the imagination, delighting fans and critics around the world.

The future of characters like Thor in the Marvel Cinematic Universe beyond Avengers: Endgame isn’t quite clear at the moment but fans of the Asgardian will be delighted to hear that Thor 4, directed by Taika Waititi, has been pitched, according to Tessa Thompson. In a recent interview with La Times, she said:

“I heard that a pitch has happened for [another Thor film]. I don’t know how real that intel is, but I hear that the pitch has happened. I think the idea is Taika Waititi [who directed ‘Ragnarok‘] would come back.”

Does the idea of Thor 4 directed by Waititi sound good to you? Let us know in the comments below on Twitter @flickeringmyth…

The post Tessa Thompson thinks Thor 4 has been pitched to Marvel appeared first on Flickering Myth.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Why There's a Good Chance We Might See Anakin in 'Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker'

  • Popsugar
Why There's a Good Chance We Might See Anakin in 'Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker'
Between his love for his family and his rise to evil, Anakin Skywalker flaunts one of the richest stories of any antihero in Star Wars and, more broadly, pop culture. The release of The Rise of Skywalker is just around the corner, and we can't help but wonder if this iconic fallen Jedi will return to cap off the sequel trilogy. Luckily, there are certainly many factors that point toward a tentative yes, so let's investigate them closely.

Hayden Christensen, who plays Anakin in the prequels, hasn't been officially confirmed as part of the cast. Still, we can't imagine the third trilogy ending without Anakin. With Palpatine's return, it only makes sense that Anakin will come back to complete a full-circle narrative with the prequel and original trilogies in mind. Remember that the new title is The Rise of Skywalker. While this could refer to Ben Solo, who, through Leia,
See full article at Popsugar »

Noah Centineo’s ‘Masters Of The Universe’ Pushed To 2020, Distressing Teens & Middle-Aged Toy Collectors Worldwide

Noah Centineo’s ‘Masters Of The Universe’ Pushed To 2020, Distressing Teens & Middle-Aged Toy Collectors Worldwide
If you listen closely, you’ll hear the combined cries of middle-aged men and teenage girls from around the world. Why? Because it’s been announced that the upcoming adaptation of popular ‘80s toy line/cartoon “Masters of the Universe” has been pushed back from later this year until 2020. That means that we still are at least a year away from heartthrob Noah Centineo showing us what he’s got as the popular character He-Man.
See full article at The Playlist »

The Morning Watch: Where Hollywood Airplane Scenes Are Shot, ‘John Wick’ in 60 Seconds & More

The Morning Watch: Where Hollywood Airplane Scenes Are Shot, ‘John Wick’ in 60 Seconds & More
The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows. In this edition, find out who’s responsible for making a lot […]

The post The Morning Watch: Where Hollywood Airplane Scenes Are Shot, ‘John Wick’ in 60 Seconds & More appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Cannes: Thierry Fremaux on the Lineup’s Record Number of Female Directors, American Cinema and Political Films

Cannes: Thierry Fremaux on the Lineup’s Record Number of Female Directors, American Cinema and Political Films
The Cannes Film Festival has unveiled a lineup for its 72nd edition that includes some high-profile Hollywood titles, genre movies and films from 13 female directors. The official selection has been applauded by many for mixing established auteurs like Pedro Almodovar (“Pain and Glory”), Terrence Malick (“A Hidden Life”) and Xavier Dolan (“Matthias and Maxime”) with newcomers such as French-Senegalese helmer Mati Diop (“Atlantique”) and Ladj Ly (“Les Miserables”).

Cannes chief Thierry Fremaux sat with Variety to discuss the showing of political films, the presence of women filmmakers in the official selection and the festival’s relationship with American cinema.

Although this year’s competition roster is less political than last year, you have a few politically minded films, especially “Les Miserables” which is inspired by the 2005 riots in Paris. This year has been marked by widespread civic unrest in France. To what extent do you take into consideration current events during the selection process?
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Kalank review – an opulent attempt to save the Bollywood melodrama

Abhishek Varman spares no expense in this tale of forbidden love – but heavenly visuals are marred by clunky storytelling

With the oddly titled Kalank (Blemish), we find Bollywood in something of a pickle. Since the runaway global success of the two-part Telugu epic Baahubali, Indian producers have followed a bigger-is-better credo, drumming up a succession of thunderous historical throwbacks such as Manikarnika, which summoned multitudes of extras but precious little poetry or wonder.

Audiences have started to gravitate instead towards more personal stories and pithier genre fare, such as surprise-pregnancy comedy Badhaai Ho and horror Stree.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Let There Be Light – the Christian film taking on the secular-industrial complex

Kevin Sorbo’s Godsploitation flick features a cynical atheist finding religion with help from Sean Hannity. Is it as bad as it sounds? We speak to its creators

Imagine a film in which Christopher Hitchens has been born again as The SimpsonsNed Flanders. And that he gets endorsement from Donald Trump’s preferred blowhard, Fox News’s Sean Hannity, for a Christian phone app to be deployed against the forces of darkness. You would watch that, right?

Let There Be Light is that movie. Released in the Us in 2017, but only now getting a UK release, it stars Kevin Sorbo as Sol Harkens, the self-styled “world’s biggest atheist”, who undergoes a cinematic conversion that for sheer verve rivals Michael Caine’s in The Muppets Christmas Carol.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Once Upon a Time in London review – unconvincing gangland saga

This true crime-inspired trudge through the cockney underworld is both misleadingly romanticised and too cheaply produced

Somehow, this true-crime-inspired gangster film brings to mind the 80s/90s concept of “heritage cinema”, a phrase that back in the day was applied to films by Merchant Ivory and any literary adaptation of the era. This particular period drama, however, has no ladies in crinolines sipping tea. Indeed, this recounting of the rise and fall of London mob boss Jack “Spot” Comer (Terry Stone) and his protege-cum-rival Billy Hill (Leo Gregory) mostly features lairy cockney men swearing and slicing each other up with cut-throat razors or finding even more inventive ways to inflict pain. But the film’s nostalgic posturing – where boozy nights in the pub were soundtracked by skiffle-band covers, £80 was a lot of money and all prostitutes were pretty – is just as misleading and romanticised as anything that Helena Bonham Carter
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

UK box office preview: 'Red Joan' leads openers; family-friendly holdovers to dominate

UK box office preview: 'Red Joan' leads openers; family-friendly holdovers to dominate
Greta’, ’Dragged Across Concrete’ among new titles.

Holdovers look set to dominate the UK box office this weekend, with Trevor Nunn’s spy drama Red Joan amongst the new openers.

Produced by David Parfitt’s Trademark Films, the Lionsgate-distributed feature is led by Judi Dench and 2014 Screen Star of Tomorrow Sophie Cookson, and based on the novel of the same name by Jennie Rooney. Cookson plays Joan Stanley, a Cambridge physics student in 1938 who falls for a young communist; while Dench takes up the character in 2000 when MI5 come to arrest her.

The film will be aiming to top
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Film Review: ‘Nureyev’

Film Review: ‘Nureyev’
It would be absurd to say that Rudolf Nureyev lived, or danced, in anyone’s shadow. He was a man who leapt and twirled and flew onstage, all muscle but light as a feather, with a freedom and force that reconfigured the human spirit. There’s no denying, though, that over the last few decades, and especially since 1993 (the year he died of AIDS), the image of Nureyev as the flashing erotic god of ballet has been eclipsed, more than a little bit, by that of his compatriot and inheritor Mikhail Baryshnikov. There are several generations who are now more familiar with the life story, and the unearthly grace, of Misha than they are with the florid Cold War animal magnetism of Nureyev.

That makes a finely crafted, impeccably researched documentary like “Nureyev” a very welcome experience. The film’s release, on April 19, is clearly timed to coincide with the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Die Kinder Der Toten’

The hills are alive, with the sound of music (also mastication and the moaning of zombies) in Kelly Copper and Pavol Liska’s experimental, dialogue-free, home-movie-style riff on Elfriede Jelinek’s “Die Kinder Der Toten” (The Children of the Dead). A seminal text in Jelinek’s native Austria, the 1995 book has never been translated into English, and so the directors, who are part of New York-based performance group the Nature Theater of Oklahoma were reportedly working from a sort of CliffsNotes version of this sprawling, complex, metatextual novel — one that had hitherto been dubbed “unfilmable.”

That’s an assessment barely contradicted by Copper and Liska’s tiresome adaptation, which starts out buoyantly inventive but quickly turns grating, its one-joke premise wearing thinner as the grotesquerie is layered on thicker. Initially, however, it provides an aesthetic surprise, shot in deliciously grainy Super-8 footage, set to Wolfgang Mitterer’s bizarro-folksy score and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Idol’

How many twists can a plot undergo before it snaps? This, more than any of the many political, moral and personal conundrums that snake through “Idol,” seems to be the question writer-director Lee Su-jin is most interested in posing with his extravagantly incomprehensible sophomore feature. A seedy political thriller by way of grisly revenge movie by way of depraved psychological murder mystery, “Idol” mainly functions to give the increasingly exhausted viewer a greater appreciation for the work of Lee’s more internationally well-known peers in Korean genre cinema. Seemingly an attempt at the kind of stylishly nasty, unpredictable, category-defying thrill ride that Park Chan-wook or Bong Joon-ho can make look dazzlingly easy by comparison with their tonal high-wire acts, this fallen “Idol” takes an early tumble and spends the rest of an unnecessary 144 minutes getting hopelessly tangled in the safety net.

The film does boast an arresting opening narration, however.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Wheely review – shameless Cars rip-off skids along the hard shoulder

This uninspired animation drives in Pixar’s slipstream and holds an ethos dangerously out of step with the times

The makers of this brash and blaringly noisy family animation from Malaysia give the hot-rod rookie storyline from Pixar’s Cars a hasty respray and set it off so fast they hope nobody notices the similarities. But it really is such a blatant copycat job, ripping off Cars note for note and lifting so many elements – from talking driverless cars to the dim-witted, buck-toothed sidekick – they might as well have called it Carz.

Ogie Banks cheerfully voices Wheely, a cocksure young racing car who crashes badly, busting his axel beyond repair. His speeding days over, Wheely takes a job as a taxi – and with his career go his chances of impressing supermodel Bella (Frances Lee), a lipstick-red Ferrari-like sporty number. Besides, she’s already hooked up with a preening posh-boy motor.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Chloë Grace Moretz: 'People said: You're going to lose your career over this'

She shot to fame with Kick-Ass, then was almost derailed by a film co-starring Louis Ck. Now she’s back with the bold film Greta – and a desire to remain ‘the outspoken girl’

Chloë Grace Moretz could make almost anyone she met feel old. She pitches up for our 10.30am coffee date fresh from breakfast yoga: bright eyed and eager, with newly pierced ear cartilage. She makes straight for the brightest table in the place.

At 22, with about 60 films and TV shows under her belt, Moretz still has the face of a child star, which is to say she is a star who looks like a child, with golden hair and cartoon-size features seemingly forever on the verge of a pout. She also has the PR-buffed poise of a long-term A-lister.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film Review: ‘The Last to See Them’

Film Review: ‘The Last to See Them’
Truman Capote’s “In Cold Blood” stretches long as a late-evening shadow over Italian director Sara Summa’s feature debut “The Last to See Them.” The Italian title, “Gli Ultimi Viderli Vivere” which translates literally to “The Last to See Them Alive,” is also the heading of the opening chapter of Capote’s book. The setting is, similarly, a remote farmhouse whose four occupants — father, mother, daughter, son — will soon suffer a grisly fate. Even the book’s contested designation as a “nonfiction novel” has inescapable parallels: Summa’s film is also based on a real event, but the extent of its truthfulness is difficult to gauge.

This is largely due to the wilful austerity of the director’s coolly premeditated approach. An opening title baldly reveals that one day in 2012, four members of the Durati family were murdered — an event we soon begin to suspect we will not see — and then,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Kalank’

Film Review: ‘Kalank’
Events leading to the 1947 Partition of India serve as the forebodingly serious backdrop for the exhaustingly overextended razzmatazz of “Kalank,” writer-director Abhishek Varman’s lavish but ponderous Bollywood extravaganza, which opened in the U.S. on more than 300 screens the same day as its Indian release. Despite the preponderance of sets and costumes spectacular enough to make Baz Luhrmann weep with envy, and a handful of thrillingly choreographed production numbers that sporadically quicken the movie’s pulse and boost its eye-candy quotient, the attractive yet underwhelming lead players are too hampered by the lethargic narrative to sufficiently distract viewers from their awareness of time passing and interest diminishing.

The action unfolds in and around the city of Husnabad, a year or so before the Partition that eventually led to the establishment of India and Pakistan as independent countries. Newspaper publisher Dev Chaudhry (Aditya Roy Kapur), a well-to-do member of the Hindu-minority elite,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Star Trek: Discovery’: Season 2’s Game-Changing Twist Sets Up a Crazy Fresh Plan for Season 3

  • Indiewire
‘Star Trek: Discovery’: Season 2’s Game-Changing Twist Sets Up a Crazy Fresh Plan for Season 3
[Editor’s note: The following article contains spoilers for “Star Trek: Discovery” Season 2 Episode 14, “Such Sweet Sorry, Part 2.”]

Many words could be used to describe the Season 2 finale of “Star Trek: Discovery.” One of them is not “quiet.” Picking up after last week’s cliffhanger ending, writers Michelle Paradise, Jenny Lumet, and Alex Kurtzman, along with director Olatunde Osunsanmi, pack the episode with intense action, as the crews of the Enterprise and Discovery work together (with the help of some surprise friends) to keep a massive stockpile of data away from the evil artificial intelligence known as Control (personified by Alan van Sprang).

From the frantic assembly of Burnham’s (Sonequa Martin-Green) time suit, to the epic space battle between the Enterprise, Discovery, and Control’s ships, to the impressive hand-to-hand, gravity-challenged fight between Control, Georgiou (Michelle Yeoh), and security officer Commander Nhan (Rachael Ancheril), there’s plenty of excitement packed into the episode, all topped off by “Discovery
See full article at Indiewire »
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