Movie News

Disney's 'Aladdin' Soars Over Memorial Day Weekend at the Box Office

Disney's 'Aladdin' Soars Over Memorial Day Weekend at the Box Office
Disney's Aladdin topped the weekend with an impressive debut, delivering over $85 million for the three-day and is expected to top $100 million for the four-day, Memorial Day holiday weekend.

Meanwhile, fellow newcomers Brightburn and Booksmart finished more in line with studio expectations than Mojo's aggressive pre-weekend forecast and Avengers: Endgame will become only the second film ever to top $800 million at the domestic box office by the end of the long holiday weekend.

With an estimated $86.1 million, Disney's Aladdin topped the Memorial Day three-day weekend box office. For Disney this is something of a big win considering the studio's live action properties, outside of the Marvel Universe, have struggled for some time now.

Disney anticipates the reportedly $180+ million production will top $105 million for the four-day weekend, though rival studios expect that total to go even higher, targeting a four-day debut over $110 million, which would be enough to make it
See full article at Box Office Mojo »

Cannes: Bong Joon-ho's 'Parasite' Wins Palme d'Or

Cannes: Bong Joon-ho's 'Parasite' Wins Palme d'Or
A star-studded Cannes Film Festival came to a close Saturday night with a bang as Bong Joon-ho's Parasite took home the Palme d'Or, while Mati Diop's Atlantics landed the runner-up Grand Prix award.

The Parasite win denied Quentin Tarantino his second top prize (the Once Upon a Time in Hollywood helmer won the Palme d’Or 25 years ago for his ground breaking Pulp Fiction). Instead, the widely praised Once Upon a Time came up empty handed.

Joon-ho's dark comedy, which premiered the same night as Once Upon a Time, and drew raves. The film revolves around a man and his ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

‘Aladdin’ On Course for Bigger Memorial Day Opening Than ‘Solo’

‘Aladdin’ On Course for Bigger Memorial Day Opening Than ‘Solo’
Disney’s remake of “Aladdin” is off to a magical start at the box office, earning $31.5 million from 4,476 screens at the box office on Friday.

While trackers expected a 4-day Memorial Day weekend opening of $75-85 million, “Aladdin” is now on pace to blow that out of the water with estimates now reaching $109-111 million, higher than the $103 million 4-day start earned last year for “Solo: A Star Wars Story.”

Granted, at this point in the weekend, there’s a lot of room for “Aladdin” to either push estimates even higher or to see a big day-to-day drop. The latter was the case for “Solo,” which saw its opening estimates plummet as the weekend went on until it needed the Monday holiday to get an opening above $100 million. So swings in fortune on this busy weekend with plenty of other leisure options besides movie theaters aren’t out of the question.
See full article at The Wrap »

‘The Lovebirds’: Issa Rae-Kumail Nanjiani Paramount Comedy Moved Back By A Month

‘The Lovebirds’: Issa Rae-Kumail Nanjiani Paramount Comedy Moved Back By A Month
Paramount’s romantic comedy The Lovebirds is fleeing the nest. The film has been moved from its announced March 6 wide-release date to April 3.

Issa Rae and Kumail Nanjiani star as a couple on the brink of breaking up who get unintentionally embroiled in a bizarre murder mystery. As they get closer to clearing their names and solving the case, they need to figure out how they, and their relationship, can survive the night.

Co-stars include Kelly Murtaugh, Moses Storm and Betsy Borrego. Michael Showalter — who helmed The Big Sick, which Nanjiani co-wrote and starred in — directs from a script by Aaron Abrams, Brendan Gall and Martin Gero

Moving out of a slot against Disney/Pixar’s Onward, The Lovebirds instead will battle with Fox’s The New Mutants and an untitled DC pic from Warner Bros.

Paramount didn’t give a reason for the date change, but it comes hours
See full article at Deadline »

Robert Pattinson, Willem Dafoe’s The Lighthouse Wins Cannes Critics’ Award

  • Variety
Robert Pattinson, Willem Dafoe’s The Lighthouse Wins Cannes Critics’ Award
Robert Eggers’ “The Lighthouse,” with Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson, won the Cannes Film Festival critics’ award for best first or second feature in Directors’ Fortnight and Critics’ Week, one of the first prizes for which “The Lighthouse” has been eligible at Cannes.

The award was announced Saturday in Cannes by the Intl. Federation of Film Critics (Fipresci), which also honored Elia Suleiman’s “It Must Be Heaven” as the best film in competition and Russian Kantemir Balagov’s “Beanpole” as best film in the sidebar Un Certain Regard.

At the same awards announcement, it was revealed that Terrence Malick’s Cannes competition entry, “Hidden Life,” won the Prize of the Ecumenical Jury.

The Fipresci honor for “The Lighthouse” marks another plaudit for Eggers, who is rapidly emerging as a major talent in many critics’ view, as well as for one of the best-reviewed of movies in any section at
See full article at Variety »

'The Lighthouse', 'It Must be Heaven' win Fipresci critics' awards at Cannes

'The Lighthouse', 'It Must be Heaven' win Fipresci critics' awards at Cannes
Kantemir Balagov’s Beanpole wins best film in the Un Certain Regard sidebar.

Robert EggersThe Lighthouse won the Cannes Film Festival critics’ award for best first or second feature in Directors’ Fortnight and Critics Week.

Elia Suleiman’s It Must Be Heaven won the prize for the best film in competition, whilst Kantemir Balagov’s Beanpole won the best film in the Un Certain Regard sidebar.

The awards were announced on Saturday (May 25) by the International Federation of Film Critics (Fipresci).

Terrence Malick’s Cannes competition title, Hidden Life, won the Prize of the Ecumenical Jury, revealed at the same time.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

China Box Office: ‘Aladdin’ Opens on Top With $19 Million Weekend

Disney’s “Aladdin” opened on top of the Chinese box office with a less than magical $18.7 million debut weekend.

According to data from Artisan Gateway, the film beat previous chart winner “Detective Pikachu” which earned $7.5 million in its third weekend. That score advances the cumulative China total for “Pikachu” to $83.3 million.

The Guy Ritchie-directed “Aladdin” did fine in audience appreciation. It achieved a 7.8 out of 10 score from users on the Douban film fan site, and 9.1 from users of the Maoyan ticketing site.

“A Dog’s Journey,” which has Chinese backing through Alibaba’s share stake in producer Amblin Partners, slipped from second place to third. It scored $5.2 million to advance its cumulative total to $23.8 million.

“Mayday Life 3D,” a concert film starring the Taiwanese mega-band Mayday, opened in fourth place with a weekend score of $2.4 million.

Japanese animation, “Dragon Ball Super: Broly” earned $3.1 million in its 3-day opening weekend.

In lesser places,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Nina Wu’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Nina Wu’
“They don’t just want to take my body, they want to take my soul!” So runs the overripe line of dialogue that actress Nina Wu (Wu Kexi) has to repeat again and again in “Nina Wu,” the fascinating, glitchy, stylish, and troublesome new film from Taiwanese director Midi Z (“The Road to Mandalay”). Nina practices the line in the mirror, rehashes it in auditions (and “auditions”) and then in take after take until it becomes a kind of mantra that threads through the film, or less poetically, the line of gibberish that a doll might parrot when you pull its string. Each time, Nina cries. And each time, the words seem to get rawer, a little of their clichéd glibness scuffing off, as we discover that the film is very much about how the taking of a body can cue the taking of a soul, and furthermore, how insidiously
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes Film Review: ‘All About Yves’

Cannes Film Review: ‘All About Yves’
Benoit Forgeard’s dorky “All About Yves,” bizarrely chosen as the closing film of 2019’s Directors’ Fortnight selection in Cannes, is literally about an intelligent refrigerator that ascends to Eurovision fame as a rapper. Imagine Spike Jonze’s “Her” played for the cheapest of laughs, shorn of atmosphere, and absent all melancholic insight into our relationship with new tech, but with the addition of a freezer compartment, and you’re halfway to understanding how little there is here. It’s all pretty harmless, and it does have a very winning central performance from the non-domestic-appliance lead, William Lebghil. So perhaps, far from the raised art-house expectations of the Croisette, it might find an undemanding niche in which its farcical Francophone shenanigans will fly. Still, smart fridge; dumb movie.

Lebghil plays Jerem, an aspiring rapper who lays down tough beats about having “no fucks to give” while living in his dead grandmother’s small,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Bare Necessity’

A perfectly charmant way to, as the song has it, forget about your worries and your strife for 100 airy minutes, writer-director Erwan le Duc’s “The Bare Necessity” is a breezy little sweetheart of a debut, that threatens to give the rather ominous description “quirky French romantic comedy” a good name. In its dappled countryside sunlight, even the most ostensibly twee elements — a bumbling local police force; a nudist colony; a historical reenactment society; an eccentric rural family with a matriarch whose radio show is dedicated to the breathy discussion of, what else, l’amour — are treated with an amiably deadpan affection that is infectious without ever becoming ingratiating.

“Love Is Real” is the title of the radio phone-in hosted by Thérèse Perdrix (Fanny Ardant) during which she offers callers husky words of advice and encouragement in pursuing their various romantic follies. She is unaware, however, that the show is
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Streaming: Netflix's ode to Joy

Sudabeh Mortezai’s feature about a trafficked Nigerian sex worker gets a well-earned Netflix boost; plus, a shimmering art-rock short

For 10 years now, the august London film festival – the vast compendium of world cinema that consumes the capital’s cinephiles every autumn – has had an overall best film prize. If this young award isn’t exactly on a par with the Palme d’Or or Golden Lion for international prestige, a glance at the names of past winners makes it hard to argue with its credentials. Andrey Zvyagintsev has won it twice, as has Jacques Audiard; Lynne Ramsay nabbed it for We Need to Talk About Kevin, Kelly Reichardt for Certain Women, while Pawel Pawlikowski was honoured for Ida over a year before the Oscars did the same.

So it was a surprise when last year’s award went to a film, and film-maker, well off the radar of even most arthouse-inclined filmgoers.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Adam’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Adam’
With her debut feature “Adam,” Maryam Touzani allows her audience to sit back and relax comfortably into a beautifully made, character-driven little gem that knows when and how to touch all the right buttons. Taking the stories of two women, both frozen in existential stasis, and bringing them together in a predictable yet deeply satisfying manner, the writer-director ensures this scrupulously even two-hander about grief, shame, and the redemption of motherhood doles out emotional comfort food that’s neither too sweet nor too heavy. Graced by two exceptional leads given every opportunity to shine, “Adam” should charm audiences in global art houses.

Previously, Touzani has been known for shorts and her work with husband Nabil Ayouch, who here acts as producer as well as writing collaborator. Still, this is very much her own film, its emotional tenor and cinematic style markedly different from Ayouch’s work. In terms of structure and narrative trajectory,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes Film Review: ‘To Live to Sing’

After his taut, impressive debut “Old Stone” which tracked with nightmarish relentlessness the high cost of compassion in modern urban China, Canadian-Chinese director Johnny Ma loosens his grip a little to deliver a softer, if not necessarily less pessimistic examination of the failing fortunes of a regional Sichuan Opera troupe. “To Live to Sing” is baggier than its predecessor and less immediately accessible given that it loses “Old Stone’s” ratcheting stakes in favor of slowly dwindling hopes. But it is elevated by a beautifully compact and empathetic performance from Zhao Xiaoli, leader of the real-life opera group, whose members play fictionalized versions of themselves here. Chinese opera can seem beholden to a performance and storytelling tradition almost entirely alien to Western eyes, yet Zhao makes the transition from heavily painted, ornamented, and arcanely codified stage performer to subtle, natural, and wholly heartbreaking screen presence with exceptional grace.

Zhao plays Zhao Li,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Geoffrey Rush defamation case: newspaper's appeal 'weighs heavily' on actor

Oscar-winner wants appeal against record $2.9m judgment determined as quickly as possible, lawyer tells court

The Daily Telegraph’s appeal against the record $2.9m judgment against it in the Geoffrey Rush defamation case “weighs heavily” on the Oscar-winning actor, an Australian court has heard.

The Sydney tabloid newspaper, through its owner News Corp, is appealing against Justice Michael Wigney’s verdict in the Rush case, citing 16 grounds on which it claims the trial was miscarried and that the judge’s conduct of the case “gave rise to an apprehension of bias”.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Cannes: Oscar Gets A Jolt From Tarantino, ‘Parasite,’ Banderas & More

The 2019 Oscars were very good to the programmers of the Cannes Film Festival. After an almost desolate 2018 where it was represented by just a few Foreign Language Film nominations, the French mainstay saw a major turnaround as “BlacKkKlansman” earned a Best Picture nomination, “Cold War” landed Best Dictor and Cinematography nods (outside of an Flf nod) and a historic win for Spike Lee in the Adapted Screenplay category.

Continue reading Cannes: Oscar Gets A Jolt From Tarantino, ‘Parasite,’ Banderas & More at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Killing Eve’ Producers Break Down Who’s Dead and Whose Fate Is Uncertain in the Lethal Finale

‘Killing Eve’ Producers Break Down Who’s Dead and Whose Fate Is Uncertain in the Lethal Finale
[Editor’s Note: The following article contains spoilers for “Killing Eve” Season 2, Episode 8 finale, “You’re Mine.”]

The second season finale of “Killing Eve” reaches its inevitable conclusion when the assassin Villanelle (Jodie Comer) finally turns on MI6 agent Eve Polastri (Sandra Oh), shooting her in the back and leaving her for dead. It’s the culmination of the women’s unique relationship that blended a cat-and-mouse dynamic with an intense, unhealthy attraction. And even though the show has already been renewed for a third season, Villanelle’s deadly act brings an air of finality to this particular story as viewers know it.

IndieWire spoke to executive producer Sally Woodward Gentle and director Damon Thomas to break down that fatal finale and hint at the show’s future.

“As we did more work on [the series], we realized that Season 1 and 2 might be a really good as a pair,” said Woodward Gentle. “Having had in Season 1, Villanelle and Eve getting to know each other,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Perfection’ Director Talks Us Through the Biggest Twists in Netflix’s Shocking Thriller

Be aware there are spoilers for The Perfection below. Odds are, by now you've probably heard about Netflix's wild thriller The Perfection. If you haven't, get out of here and come back after you've watched it! The latest Netflix original comes from The Matador and regular Girls director Richard Shepard, starring Allison Williams and Logan Browning as two cello prodigies wrapped up in a twisted relationship that evolves through rivalry, romance, revenge, and a whole lot more throughout of the genre-bending film. It's a twisty and twisted thriller that continually surprises and certainly isn'…
See full article at Collider.com »

The Best Comedy Series & TV Shows on Amazon Prime Right Now

We all need a laugh sometimes. There's a reason why sitcoms are always in syndication and topping streaming metrics -- everyone loves to kick back, have some giggles and hang out with their favorite comedic actors for a while. Good news for those of you looking for some humor, Amazon Prime Video's has some of the all-time best comedy series of all time, from classics to the latest critical hits, satires, sitcoms, sketches and everything in between. Their library includes bonafide all-timers like Parks and Rec and Frasier, mini-series, Amazon's best streaming originals (including the …
See full article at Collider.com »

‘Aladdin’ Pops Up With Stronger Box-Office Debut As ‘Booksmart’ Disappoints

‘Aladdin’ Pops Up With Stronger Box-Office Debut As ‘Booksmart’ Disappoints
Aladdin,” the latest Disney retread of a key title, took in an estimated $86 million for the three-day weekend, with $105 million projected for four days. This is a surprisingly strong result; after “John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum,” it suggests the summer will follow the optimists’ path.

Memorial Day weekend, once the official start of summer movie play, has become secondary to the weeks-earlier debuts of Marvel titles. Though still a prime date, recent years have seen several films fall short; last year’s “Solo: A Star Wars Story” didn’t gross $100 million.

Still, even with “Aladdin” outpacing “Solo,” the three-day totals are about 5% down from last year and May will end with revenues off about 10% off from 2018. But the results this weekend actually give hope that this summer will further trim that shortfall.

Upcoming are franchise titles like “Godzilla,” “Men in Black,” “Shaft,” “Child’s Play,” “Toy Story,” “Annabelle,” and “Spider-Man,” all before July 4th.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Game of Thrones’ Season 8 Marks All-Time Low for Amount of Dialogue Spoken in the Series

‘Game of Thrones’ Season 8 Marks All-Time Low for Amount of Dialogue Spoken in the Series
Diehard fans of “Game of Thrones” have been vocal about all the reasons why they’ve been disappointed in the final season, but most of the criticisms boil down to not enough storytelling to give characters their proper evolution. In fact, poor writing has been cited in the online petition to remake Season 8.

David Benioff and D.B. Weiss have proven themselves to be woefully incompetent writers when they have no source material (i.e. the books) to fall back on,” the petition states. “This series deserves a final season that makes sense. Subvert my expectations and make it happen, HBO!”

Now it appears that there’s e data to show that the writing has changed from when the series first started to how it ended. According to data that GitHub member Mr. Quart crunched from OpenSubtitles.org, The words spoken per minute in each “Game of Thrones” episode has gone
See full article at Indiewire »
An error has occured. Please try again.

Recently Viewed