Indie News

Weinstein Company Pulls ‘War With Grandpa’, ‘The Upside’ & ‘Mary Magdalene’ Off Release Schedule

Weinstein Company Pulls ‘War With Grandpa’, ‘The Upside’ & ‘Mary Magdalene’ Off Release Schedule
While the Weinstein Company deals with a few internal matters, it has pulled three Dimension films from their 2018 release dates. Robert De Niro-Christopher Walken starrer The War with Grandpa had been set for February 23, Bryan Cranston-Kevin Hart comedy The Upside gives up its March 9 date, and biblical biopic Mary Magdalene starring Rooney Mara has exited the March 30 slot.

War with Grandpa and The Upside were set for wide release, and Mary Magdalene had been slated…
See full article at Deadline »

‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’ Review: Kind Man’s Story Carries Powerful Message in Unkind Times

‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’ Review: Kind Man’s Story Carries Powerful Message in Unkind Times
If conflict is at the heart of most documentaries, how do you make a film about the nicest, kindest, least conflict-ridden person in the history of television? More specifically, how do you make a doc about Mister Rogers? That was the task that faced Morgan Neville, who won an Oscar for “20 Feet From Stardom,” his film about the struggles faced by a group of backup singers. He was last at Sundance with “Best of Enemies,” a gripping doc about a series of epic (and vicious) debates between William Buckley Jr. and Gore Vidal. Fred Rogers, the subject of Neville’s new...
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‘Monsters and Men’ Review: A Compelling Study of Racial Turmoil to Fit Our Confused Times — Sundance 2018

‘Monsters and Men’ Review: A Compelling Study of Racial Turmoil to Fit Our Confused Times — Sundance 2018
Reinaldo Marcus Green’s drama “Monsters and Men” rips from the headlines while going beyond them, following the aftermath of police shooting an unarmed black man from several different perspectives. Green, who makes his directorial debut with this feature after a substantial filmography of shorts, has essentially applied that same skill here. Though at times its message-oriented plot veers toward the obvious, Green’s measured screenplay manages to ask big questions without overstating them. The triptych of stories don’t overlap in obvious ways, and so Green’s quietly effective drama functions less as a linear narrative than a three-point meditation on African American identity at a moment of profound confusion.

It starts, as these stories so often do, with a viral video: Young family man Manny (Anthony Ramos) is hanging out with his peers
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‘The Guilty’: Single Location, Real-Time Thriller Crackles With Tension [Sundance Review]

‘The Guilty’: Single Location, Real-Time Thriller Crackles With Tension [Sundance Review]
This debut from Gustav Möller begins with an extreme close-up on a headset, as we hear frantic audio being received by emergency dispatcher Asger Holm (Jakob Cedergren). “The Guilty” soon zooms out, but it never goes very far. The tense Danish thriller is set exclusively in two adjoining rooms of the dispatch station; all the action happens off screen, over the phone in real time, as Asger desperately tries to help the woman on the other end.

Continue reading ‘The Guilty’: Single Location, Real-Time Thriller Crackles With Tension [Sundance Review] at The Playlist.
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GLAAD Media Awards: The Complete List of Nominees

GLAAD Media Awards: The Complete List of Nominees
As the nominations for the 29th annual GLAAD Media Awards were announced today, Battle of the Sexes, Call Me by Your Name, Lady Bird, Professor Marston and the Wonder Women. and The Shape of Water all scored nominations for Outstanding Film in Wide Release.

Claiming noms for Outstanding Film-Limited Release were BPM, A Fantastic Woman, God's Own Country, Thelma and The Wound.

In all, 125 nominees were announced in 21 English-language categories and another 16 in four Spanish-language categories.

Actress Trace Lysette (Transparent) and actor Wilson Cruz (Star Trek: Discovery) announced the nominees live on GLAAD's Facebook page from Park City,...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Tamara Jenkins Delivers Infertility Dramedy ‘Private Life’ for Sundance Opening Night

  • The Wrap
Tamara Jenkins Delivers Infertility Dramedy ‘Private Life’ for Sundance Opening Night
Director Tamara Jenkins has always been interested in the family dynamic. The indie classic “Slums of Beverly Hills” was about failed upward mobility in the late 1970s. “The Savages” was about disinterested siblings who need to solve the problem of an ailing father.

After a ten-year break, Jenkins returned to open the 2018 Sundance Film Festival on Thursday night with “Private Life,” about a reproductively-challenged couple who need to start a family before they eviscerate the two-person unit they’ve already got.

Kathryn Hahn plays Rachel, a 41-year-old novelist who...
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“The Big Cameras Get Stopped in Security”: Alexandria Bombach on Shooting and Directing On Her Shoulders

Documentary filmmaker Alexandria Bombach released her debut feature, Frame by Frame, in 2015 to major acclaim on the festival circuit. The film screened at more than 30 festivals, including Swsx, Hot Docs, AFI Docs and the Camden International Film Festival, where it won the award for Best Documentary Feature. Bombach debuts her second feature, On Her Shoulders, in the U.S. Documentary Competition lineup at Sundance 2018. Below she discusses acting as her own cinematographer, the influence of Errol Morris’ Interrotron and filming in the “impossible heat” of a refugee camp in Athens. Filmmaker: How and why did you wind up being […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Three Identical Strangers’ Review: Triplets Separated at Birth is a Charming Story Until It Turns Into a Dark Conspiracy — Sundance 2018

The backstory of “Three Identical Strangers” is such obvious movie fodder it’s a wonder it took so long for someone to make a movie about it: In 1980, 19-year-olds Robert Shafran and Edward Galland found each other at the same community college and realized they were twins separated at birth; the ensuing press coverage led them to hear from another 19-year-old, David Kellman, who looked exactly like them. The surprise triplets became fast friends and overnight media sensations. But how did they get pulled apart in the first place?

See More:The 2018 IndieWire Sundance Bible: Every Review, Interview, and News Item Posted During the Festival

Director Tim Wardle’s competent documentary surveys this bizarre phenomenon through the experiences of the men as they entered young adulthood under the most unlikely of circumstances, while the mystery surrounding their infancy deepens as new information comes to light. However, “Three Identical Strangers” doesn’t
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Dp Noah Greenberg on Chloë Sevigny and Kristen Stewart-Starring Lizzie Borden Drama Lizzie

The 1892 murder of Lizzie Borden’s father and stepmother has inspired numerous books, TV movies and even stage musicals but few feature films. That changes with the arrival of Lizzie from director Craig William Macneill. His film pairs two of the leading actresses of American independent cinema: Chloë Sevigny as Borden and Kristen Stewart as Bridget, her live-in maid and kindred spirit. Lizzie debuts in competition at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Prior to its premiere, Filmmaker spoke with cinematographer Noah Greenberg (Most Beautiful Island) about the film’s naturalistic (and claustrophobic) visual palette. Filmmaker: How and why did you wind up being […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’: Why Gus Van Sant Cast Joaquin Phoenix in a Disabled Role — Watch

‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’: Why Gus Van Sant Cast Joaquin Phoenix in a Disabled Role — Watch
Joaquin Phoenix’s casting in “Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot” has proven controversial, given who he’s playing in Gus Van Sant’s film: John Callahan, a quadriplegic cartoonist, musician, and artist. Van Sant addressed the controversy from the IndieWire Studio at the Sundance Film Festival, saying that Callahan himself “wanted the most famous person in the world to play him” and wouldn’t have been bothered by an actor without his own disability taking on the role. Watch below.

Read More:Joaquin Phoenix’s ‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’ Casting Slammed as Offensive by Ruderman Disability Foundation

“This often comes up with all kinds of lead roles — who are the people playing the lead roles, do they have anything in common with the role itself?” Van Sant said. “I definitely would have used a particular person that was quadriplegic if they were the right actor,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Grace and Frankie’ Review: A Strong and Surprising Season 4 Dares to Face Death — and Gives It the Finger

‘Grace and Frankie’ Review: A Strong and Surprising Season 4 Dares to Face Death — and Gives It the Finger
When does a funny story become sad? Typically in television, this kind of question is framed around arrested development: A grown man is still acting like he’s in college, and certain events force him to look himself in the mirror and say, “Getting that drunk and acting that dumb isn’t funny anymore. It’s sad.”

But what if it’s not arrested development? What if it’s unstoppable regression? Continuing its fearless quest to address the anxieties associated with aging, “Grace and Frankie” dares to ask if its characters’ wild misadventures aren’t actually funny anymore. Maybe they’re scary. Maybe these two best friends are losing control of their minds, bodies, and lives. Maybe they don’t even know it’s happening, as it’s happening. Maybe they need help.

Read More:7 New Netflix Shows to Binge in January 2018, and the Best Episodes of Each

It’s a jarring choice,
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Octavia Spencer: #MeToo Movement Can’t Devolve Into ‘Women Versus Men’

Octavia Spencer: #MeToo Movement Can’t Devolve Into ‘Women Versus Men’
Oscar-winning actress Octavia Spencer hasn’t shied away from repping the #TimesUp movement throughout this year’s awards season – she appeared on the Golden Globes red carpet wearing all black, alongside her good friend Jessica Chastain – but she’s also eager for the movement to be as prudent and savvy as possible.

As part of Sundance’s conversation section “Power of Story,” Spencer participated in a Friday afternoon panel alongside other creators and thinkers, including actress and “Insecure” creator Issa Rae, tech evangelist Megan Smith, Open Society Foundations president Patrick Gaspard, and Killer Films founder Christine Vachon, for a discussion moderated by Washington Post journalist Sarah Ellison. The theme of the chat was “culture shift,” and sought to discuss the various ways that their work plus “the power of media and the role creative choices play in shifting culture and crystallizing the national conversation.”

Read More:Sundance Questions: Here’s What
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Steven Spielberg Eyeing ‘Indiana Jones 5’ & ‘West Side Story’ For His Next Films

Steven Spielberg Eyeing ‘Indiana Jones 5’ & ‘West Side Story’ For His Next Films
Steven Spielberg is not one of those filmmakers who sits around waiting for projects to develop. There’s rarely a year that passes where he isn’t working on something, and across the past twelve months or so, he simultaneously shot, edited, and released “The Post,” all while juggling post-production on “Ready Player One.” So it goes, the director is now looking to fill up his calendar with something new (or two).

Continue reading Steven Spielberg Eyeing ‘Indiana Jones 5’ & ‘West Side Story’ For His Next Films at The Playlist.
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‘Planet Earth: Blue Planet II’ Is Must-Watch TV That Will Make You Forget All About Porgs

‘Planet Earth: Blue Planet II’ Is Must-Watch TV That Will Make You Forget All About Porgs
While “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” was divisive for its storytelling, most everyone could agree that porgs are adorable. The fictional sea birds (or are they rodents?) from a galaxy far, far away captured the audience’s imagination, as did the other fascinating fauna created for that universe. Hell, even those fish nuns inspired devotion in unexpected quarters.

But let’s not forget that the “Star Wars” bestiary has always been inspired by real-life creatures, and there are clear puffin influences in the porg design. In fact, “Planet Earth: Blue Planet II” reminds us that the creatures we find in our natural world are so ingeniously designed that they simply blow porgs out of the water — so to speak.

Blue Planet II” boasts fish that are transgender; that live on land; that use tools. And that’s just the beginning of the fascinating stories found in the docu-series. Make no mistake that these are stories,
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“My Own Feeling of Unease in Living with and on the Internet”: Director Bo Burnham | Eighth Grade

As you made your film during the increasingly chaotic backdrop of the last year, how did you as a filmmaker control, ignore, give in to or, conversely, perhaps creatively exploit the wild and unpredictable? What roles did chaos and order play in your films? Chaos was pretty much the name of the game for our film. Our film concerns two very specific and incredibly chaotic times: eighth grade and right now — and we wanted to portray those times honestly. Not to interpret what was happening and provide answers, but to capture what’s happening and pursue the feeling of not […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Paterno’ Trailer: Al Pacino Doesn’t Want to Say What He Knew or When He Knew It in HBO Drama — Watch

HBO has released the trailer for “Paterno,” its upcoming movie about — wait for it — Joe Paterno. Al Pacino plays the disgraced coach, who became the winningest college-football coach in history prior to his involvement in the Jerry Sandusky scandal. Watch below.

Read More:Al Pacino on HBO’s Joe Paterno Movie: ‘The Question Isn’t Just What He Knew, It’s What He Did About It’

“The question isn’t just what he knew, it’s what he did about it,” Pacino said last week at the Television Critics Association. “I think he knew there were complaints. He knew there were rumors. […] I don’t think he was very fond of Sandusky, for whatever reasons — I think there were other reasons.”

“He did act upon it,” Pacino added. “He did say he thought someone should look into this. [But] a guy like Paterno — he’s like an emperor, he’s like a king.
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‘The Other Side of the Wind’: Paul Thomas Anderson, Quentin Tarantino, and Rian Johnson Attend First Screening

‘The Other Side of the Wind’: Paul Thomas Anderson, Quentin Tarantino, and Rian Johnson Attend First Screening
The Other Side of the Wind,” Orson Welles’ final unfinished film, is finally approaching completion. According to Welles fan site Wellesnet, a cut of the film screened for a select group of Hollywood elite Tuesday in Santa Monica, 42 years after principal photography finished. An attendee at the screening described it as more than a rough cut, but not a final product. Filmmakers in attendance at the screening included Paul Thomas Anderson, Quentin Tarantino, Peter Bogdanovich, and Rian Johnson.

Last year, Netflix announced it was acquiring the movie and funding its completion, which has been overseen by producers Frank Marshall and Filip Jan Rymsza. Bogdanovich, who was charged by Welles with finishing the film in the event of his death, is an executive producer.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Crime + Punishment’: An Upsetting & Enraging Portrait Of The NYPD [Sundance Review]

We’re not short on events and bulletins worth getting pissed over in 2018, but let’s not use that as an excuse to exclude further events and bulletins from pissing us off, too. Take documentary filmmaker Stephen Maing’s latest feature, “Crime + Punishment,” an up-close and confrontational exposé of bureaucratic corruption in the New York City Police Department; you probably don’t need reminding of America’s problem with law enforcement overstepping the bounds of their authority, but Maing reminds you anyways because frankly, you can never have too many reminders that police in the U.S.

Continue reading ‘Crime + Punishment’: An Upsetting & Enraging Portrait Of The NYPD [Sundance Review] at The Playlist.
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‘Time Share’ Paints A Darkly Comedic, Complex Portrait Of A Family Vacation Gone Awry [Sundance Review]

Almost five years since the 2012 release “Halley,” Sebastian Hoffman returns to the director’s chair for an equally chilling yet comedic project “Tiempo Compartido” (“Time Share”), the lone Mexican production appearing at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

“Tiempo Compartido” follows the absurd events surrounding Pedro (Luis Gerardo Méndez) and his family who just want to enjoy their “paradise” getaway in a tropical villa at Everfields International Resorts.

Continue reading ‘Time Share’ Paints A Darkly Comedic, Complex Portrait Of A Family Vacation Gone Awry [Sundance Review] at The Playlist.
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‘Paterno’ Trailer: Al Pacino Faces The Jerry Sandusky Scandal

Barry Levinson and HBO have cultivated a great working relationship in the past few years, with the channel releasing his two films, the Al Pacino starring “You Don’t Know Jack” in 2010 and, most recently, his acclaimed Robert De Niro film “The Wizard of Lies” last year. He returns to the channel with “Paterno,” re-teaming with Pacino to explore Penn State’s football coach Joe Paterno’s role in the Jerry Sandusky sexual abuse scandal.

Continue reading ‘Paterno’ Trailer: Al Pacino Faces The Jerry Sandusky Scandal at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »
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