Indie News

Rex Pickett’s Drama ‘Repairman’ Moving Forward as a Movie

Rex Pickett’s Drama ‘Repairman’ Moving Forward as a Movie
Brian A. Metcalf (“Living Among Us”) has been set to direct the feature film “Repairman,” based on an original screenplay written by Rex Pickett, author of the novel “Sideways,” Variety has learned exclusively.

Pickett’s work has served as the basis for two Oscar-winning works. The screenplay for “Sideways” won the 2005 Academy Award for best adapted screenplay for Alexander Payne and Jim Taylor. In 2000, Pickett’s screenplay for Barbara Schock’s short “My Mother Dreams the Satan’s Disciples in New York” won the Academy Award for best live action short.

Metcalf wrote, directed, and produced “Living Among Us,” starring the late John Heard in his final screen appearance along with Esme Bianco (“Game of Thrones”), Thomas Ian Nicholas, William Sadler, and Andrew Keegan.

Pickett’s “Repairman” follows Hap Rosecrans, a washing machine repairman who is a victim of fetal alcohol syndrome. He’s a recovering alcoholic, as well as a reformed arsonist, caring for his
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Movement Takes U.S. Rights to ‘Egon Schiele,’ ‘Welcome to Germany’ (Exclusive)

Film Movement Takes U.S. Rights to ‘Egon Schiele,’ ‘Welcome to Germany’ (Exclusive)
Film Movement has taken U.S. rights to “Egon Schiele — Death and the Maiden” and “Welcome to Germany.” Sales for both pics are being handled by Berlin-based Picture Tree Intl.

Dieter Berner’s biopic of Austrian artist Egon Schiele, whose paintings scandalized Viennese society, is based on a novel by Hilde Berger, and stars rising young talent Noah Saavedra. The film, which is produced by Novotny & Novotny Filmproduktion, Amour Fou and Ulrich Seidl Filmproduktion, has been sold to more than 30 territories.

Simon Verhoeven’s comedy “Welcome to Germany,” about a young Nigerian refugee who moves in with a middle-class German family, was released by Warner Bros. in Germany, where it grossed $28 million. It is produced by Wiedemann & Berg Film, Sentana Filmproduktion, and SevenPictures Film.

Film Movement’s president Michael Rosenberg said: “We are very happy to start business with Picture Tree on two very audience driven quality pictures that will surely resonate with U.S. audiences
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Best F(r)iends’ Trailer: Tommy Wiseau and Greg Sestero Return From ‘The Room’ With a Bizarre Mortician Drama — Watch

‘Best F(r)iends’ Trailer: Tommy Wiseau and Greg Sestero Return From ‘The Room’ With a Bizarre Mortician Drama — Watch
Lest you dismiss Tommy Wiseau as a one-trick pony, know that the writer, director, producer, and star of “The Room” is back with a new project. He and Greg Sestero, who co-starred in the notoriously bad movie that serves as the basis of the Oscar-nominated “The Disaster Artist,” have collaborated once again. As evidenced by the new trailer for “Best F(r)iends,” their latest team-up looks almost as odd as their first. Watch below.

Here’s the synopsis: “When a drifter (Sestero) is taken in by a peculiar mortician (Wiseau), the two hatch an underground enterprise off the back of the mortician’s old habits. But greed, hatred, and jealousy soon come in turn, and their efforts unravel, causing the drifter to run off with the spoils and leaving the mortician adrift. An expedition across the South West introduces wild and crazy characters through a series of twisted and
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‘The Bachelor,’ ‘Celebrity Big Brother,’ NBA All-Star Game Lead Winter Olympics Counterprogramming — Ratings Watch

NBC’s Winter Olympics juggernaut from PyeongChang, South Korea, continued to dominate the primetime ratings for the week ending February 18, but audiences not feeling the Olympic fever had plenty of other options — particularly of the unscripted variety.

The night of Tuesday, Feb. 13 was the most-watched night of the Olympics last week, featuring Shaun White and Mikaela Shiffrin going for gold. All seven nights of the Olympics were the top-rated programs of the week, among both adults 18-49 and viewers. Viewership is down from the 2014 Sochi Games, although still solid. Here’s a side-by-side comparison so far from NBC:

Winter Olympics Primetime Total Audience Delivery

2018 Viewership 2014 Viewership

Opening Thur. 17.2 million 20.0 million

First Fri. 28.3 million 31.7 million

First Sat. 24.2 million 25.1 million

First Sun. 26.0 million 26.3 million

First Mon. 22.3 million 22.4 million

First Tues. 22.6 million 23.7 million

First Wed. 19.2 million 20.8 million

Mid. Thur. 19.3 million 22.9 million

Mid. Fri. 19.2 million 19.2 million

Mid. Sat. 16.1 million 17.1 million

Mid. Sun. 18.2 million 21.3 million

2nd Mon.
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‘Catwoman’ Screenwriter Blasts His Own Creation as a ‘Very, Very Bad’ Movie With ‘Zero Cultural Relevance’

‘Catwoman’ Screenwriter Blasts His Own Creation as a ‘Very, Very Bad’ Movie With ‘Zero Cultural Relevance’
Catwoman” is a bad movie, and everyone involved knows it. That includes Halle Berry, who thanked her agent for getting her “this shitty-ass movie” when she accepted her Razzie Award for Best Actress, and at least one of the many credited screenwriters.

One of them, John Rogers took to Twitter last night after a contributor to the Federalist asked a bad-faith question about why the ill-fated comic-book movie didn’t receive the kind of praise Michelle Obama doled out to “Black Panther,” holding nothing back in the process: “As one of the credited writers of Catwoman, I believe I have the authority to say: because it was a shit movie dumped by the studio at the end of a style cycle, and had zero cultural relevance either in front of or behind the camera,” he said.

“This is a bad take. Feel shame,” Rogers added before elaborating on his experience with the film.
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Zac Efron Shares New Images From His Ted Bundy Biopic ‘Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil, and Vile’

Zac Efron Shares New Images From His Ted Bundy Biopic ‘Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil, and Vile’
Zac Efron playing a serial killer may at first seem an odd choice if you don’t know much about the murderer in question: Ted Bundy, who was regarded as good-looking and charismatic — traits he used to lure in his 30+ female victims. Efron stars in the appropriately named “Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil, and Vile,” and just shared new photos from the set. Avail yourself of them below.

Lily Collins, John Malkovich, Haley Joel Osment, Terry Kinney, Jim Parsons, Kaya Scodelario, and Metallica’s James Hetfield (yes, really) co-star in the film, which is being directed by Joe Berlinger. Best known for his documentaries — including and especially the essential “Paradise Lost” trilogy — Berlinger also helmed the ill-fated “Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2.”

“Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil, and Vile,” whose attention-grabbing title is lifted directly from one of Bundy’s guilty verdicts, has yet to receive a release date.
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‘Call Me by Your Name’: Sufjan Stevens to Perform ‘Mystery of Love’ at the Oscars

‘Call Me by Your Name’: Sufjan Stevens to Perform ‘Mystery of Love’ at the Oscars
Now that he’s been nominated for an Academy Award, Sufjan Stevens is about to take the next logical step: performing at the actual ceremony. The singer/songwriter received a nod in the Best Original Song category for “Mystery of Love,” one of two tunes he contributed to the “Call Me by Your Name” soundtrack; his other, “Visions of Gideon,” didn’t receive a nod.

Also performing next weekend are Gael García Bernal, Mary J. Blige, Andra Day, Natalia Lafourcade, Miguel, Keala Settle, and Common, who won in the same category for “Glory,” from the “Selma” soundtrack. Bernal, Lafourcade and Miguel will perform “Remember Me” from “Coco,” Blige is set to perform “Mighty River” from “Mudbound,” Common and Andra Day are performing “Stand Up for Something” from “Marshall,” and Settle will perform “This Is Me” from “The Greatest Showman.”

A critical darling, “Call Me by Your Name” is also nominated
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Berlinale 2018. It's Dark Here

Season of the DevilCan a completely grueling experience be worth the effort, the investment of time and self? In the case of An Elephant Sitting Still, the first film by the young Chinese novelist Hu Bo, we’re talking about a four-hour story of such constant despair that not a single moment of joy or literal ray of sunlight pierces its desperate drama. But it is most definitely worth the ordeal. This bleak opus is not only the first but also the last film by Hu Bo, who killed himself at the age of 29 after its completion. This desire of some for release from life's onslaught of sorrow, ill-luck, bad decisions and a lack of compassion or even superficial pleasure can be felt in every single brutal minute of this sprawling film.Initially, the despair is repulsive, not a glimpse but a full on plunge into the void. A gangster
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Teenagers Are About to Conquer the World, and Netflix Saw It Coming

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If you are looking for hope in bleak times right now, brace yourself for Jahi Di’allo Winston, who plays Luke in Netflix’s new teen dramedy “Everything Sucks.”

“The truth of the matter is, a country where the youth are silent — that country is on its way down. Not even on its way down, it’s dead. So, if you don’t have young people telling their opinions and how they feel, showing their true emotions, you’re not gonna go very far and evolve very much as a society. That’s just what it is,” Winston said recently to IndieWire.

That interview happened just a few weeks before the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, yet another horrific moment of violence for America that has led to a lot of heartbreak and tears — but has also given us a new appreciation for the youth of today,
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‘Museum’ Starring Gael Garcia Bernal Is An Endlessly Entertaining Heist Story [Berlin Review]

One of the perks of the film festival model is its ability to nurture talented filmmakers. These potential auteurs work their way up from selective short film programs to sidebars, hoping to eventually enter the big-league competitions of the European Three: Cannes, Venice and Berlin. Mexican director Alonso Ruizpalacios fits this description to a tee; after cutting his teeth on lauded short films, the director left the Berlin International Film Festival in 2014 with a justly-deserved Best First Film prize for “Güeros.” Ruizpalacios returns to the Berlinale — in Competition, no less — with the Gael García Bernal-starring “Museum.” It’s an endlessly entertaining, challenging investigation of history that confirms Ruizpalacios’ status as the next big thing in Mexican cinema.
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‘Luke Cage,’ ‘Power,’ and More Show Bosses Reveal Why TV Diversity is Low: ‘You Hire What’s Comfortable’

For some of the minds behind the shows working hardest to depict African-American points-of-view today, it wasn’t diversity that now created proper representation on screen: It was different perspectives that helped lead to inclusive writers’ rooms.

On February 13, the Paley Center for Media hosted a panel discussion with African-American showrunners, executive producers, and content creators to reveal their strategies towards hiring and developing new talent. The event, “They Run The Show: African-American Creators and Producers in Conversation,” was a part of the center’s ongoing celebration of Black History Month and the latest installment in their “African-American Achievements in Television: A Black History Spotlight” series.

“The ideal thing as a showrunner, for me, is to hire as many people who are different from me as possible,” “Power” creator and showrunner Courtney A. Kemp told IndieWire.

Read More: ‘Black-ish,’ ‘Insecure,’ and Others Aren’t Just ‘Black Shows,’ As Nielsen Study
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Shadows of Sarajevo: An Interview with André Gil Mata

Snowy houses on a winter’s night. A boy traces his finger on a cold window. Very slowly, a camera tracks backwards to reveal his surroundings: a small home where his mother prepares dinner. In the opening shot of The Tree, the Tarkovsky phrase “sculpting in time” comes to mind. Moving at a slow, meditative pace, the viewer doesn’t just observe this scene but thinks and feels through it along with the director. The cold is palpable, as is the boy’s loneliness, and the camera continues to recede only to begin tracking laterally against a wall until we enter what appears to be the same home but many years later, finding an old man lying down with his dog. While nothing is made explicit, as there is hardly any dialogue in the film until its final passage, the connection between the boy and this man is clear. In a series of long takes,
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‘Seven Seconds’ Review: Regina King Rules an Overwritten Netflix Drama That Painfully Examines Pain and Suffering

‘Seven Seconds’ Review: Regina King Rules an Overwritten Netflix Drama That Painfully Examines Pain and Suffering
Seven Seconds” is a series so intent on creating drama, it often forgets the point behind such weighty scenes of loss, grief, and anguish. Whether it’s overly focused on a squad of cops who are objectively bad men, or a little too keen to watch a brokenhearted mother weep, Veena Sud’s unwieldy Netflix original series is carried along by a sturdy “Law & Order” structure and another superb turn from Regina King.

Meet Kj Harper (Clare-Hope Ashitey), a young assistant prosecutor who’s given a case the cops describe to her as a “slam-dunk.” That’s good, because Harper is in no shape to handle anything challenging. A semi-functioning alcoholic with a knack for falling asleep during her karaoke number, Kj is your classic self-hating narcissist. She will drink or sleep with anything that serves as a distraction from her painful existence, even though whatever she’s suffering
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‘Andi Mack’: Bar Mitzvah Episode Explores Youth Anxiety in a Frightening but Compassionate Way

‘Andi Mack’: Bar Mitzvah Episode Explores Youth Anxiety in a Frightening but Compassionate Way
[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from the “Andi Mack” episode “Cyrus’ Bash Mitzvah.”]

With an exuberant title like “Cyrus’ Bash Mitzvah!” Friday’s one-hour episode of “Andi Mack” lived up to the hype. The celebration held to observe Cyrus Goodman (Joshua Rush) becoming a man was as over-the-top as one would hope for the theatrical teenager. The “bash mitzvah” had it all: carnival games, a killer dance tribute, an enigmatic fortune teller, a caricaturist, something ridiculous called bungee racing, and a few unexpected revelations.

In the episode, the party serves as the backdrop for each of the characters to come to terms with some news, with varying results. Perhaps the most surprising reaction of all comes from Jonah Beck (Asher Angel), the perpetually cheerful Ultimate team captain who had been maybe dating (but let’s not put a label on it) the series’ protagonist, Andi Mack (Peyton Elizabeth Lee). Frustrated with existing in a dating limbo, Andi breaks off their strange semi-romantic relationship.
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Pasek And Paul On ‘Greatest Showman’ And What They Learned From Last Year’s Oscars

Unless you’ve just emerged from a two-year coma or completely block out anything dealing with musical theater you’re probably well aware of Justin Paul and Benj Pasek, aka Pasek and Paul. The songwriting duo have taken Broadway by storm with their Tony-Award winning phenomenon “Dear Evan Hansen” and won the Best Original Song Oscar for “City of Stars” from “La La Land,” the hit musical for which they wrote almost every song.
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Final Oscar Predictions: We Go Through the Major Categories of an Unpredictable Year — IndieWire’s Movie Podcast

Final Oscar Predictions: We Go Through the Major Categories of an Unpredictable Year — IndieWire’s Movie Podcast
After months and months of talking about the same movies, the end of Oscar season is right around the corner — and many of the major categories remain unpredictable. By this time last year, “Get Out” had already started to gain some buzz as an awards contender, but the conversation got a lot more complicated in the summer, when “Dunkirk” took off, and then again in the fall with the rapturous receptions for “Lady Bird,” “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” and “The Shape of Water,” which many consider to be the frontrunner for Best Picture.

Or is it? After last year’s big win for “Moonlight,” nothing is certain, and the range of options for Academy voters in 2018 makes the race especially hard to parse. Nevertheless, Eric Kohn and Anne Thompson give it a shot in this week’s Screen Talk, digging through the major categories for whatever clues they can find.
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‘The Tick’: Amazon’s Superhero TV Show Got Better When It Stopped Trying to Be a Movie

‘The Tick’: Amazon’s Superhero TV Show Got Better When It Stopped Trying to Be a Movie
[Editor’s note: The following contains spoilers for the ending of “The Tick” Season 1.]

Woe to the next showrunner who triumphantly stands before a group of TV writers and proclaims their series to be more like a “[insert number here]-hour movie.” That formulation has plagued many shows over the past decade, even if there’s not always a one-to-one correlation between that approach and the quality of a show overall.

Ben Edlund, creator of The Tick and the man behind a third TV version of the superhero he brought to life on his comic’s pages, may not have conceived of the most recent Amazon season as a movie in multiple parts. But the first half of the season, released last August, mostly played out like one. Rejecting a lot of the episode-by-episode beats of a more traditional TV show, the result was a half-season of a comedy in search of an anchor.

As Ben Travers pointed out in his review of Part
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Roger Deakins’ Legacy is Bigger Than an Oscar: A Frank Conversation With the Cinematography Legend

Roger Deakins’ Legacy is Bigger Than an Oscar: A Frank Conversation With the Cinematography Legend
The Roger talk started in July, when the “Blade Runner 2049” trailer dropped three months before the film’s release. From just two minutes of footage, it was clear that Denis Villeneuve’s reimagining of the Ridley Scott’s visionary world 32 years into the future could finally provide a sufficiently stunning showcase for the“naturalistic” cinematographer.

But during the long awards season, another narrative came into play. Deakins’ recognition may be long overdue after 14 nominations, but there was also an entire gender that had been previously overlooked. This was the year that Rachel Morrison’s stunning work on “Mudbound” received the first-ever Oscar nomination for a female cinematographer.

The result is a front-page level of attention for a below-the-line category. Deakins like to preach that DPs should go unnoticed, but that’s not to be this year. “I’m really happy working on this film ‘The Goldfinch’ right now,” joked
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Jason Priestley on His New Show as an Antidote to Dark TV, and Why He Didn’t Want to Revisit ‘90210’ — Turn It On Podcast

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Jason Priestley on His New Show as an Antidote to Dark TV, and Why He Didn’t Want to Revisit ‘90210’ — Turn It On Podcast
Don’t ask Jason Priestley about a “Beverly Hills, 90210” reboot. For one thing, it has already been done: The second “90210” aired on The CW from 2008 to 2013. And although Priestley returned to direct, he wasn’t interested in reviving his character and appearing on camera.

“I couldn’t figure out a reason why Brandon would still be hanging around there,” Priestley told IndieWire’s Turn It On. “He left. I couldn’t figure out why.”

Priestley has worked on plenty of TV and film since the O.G. “90210,” including series like “Tru Calling,” “Call Me Fitz” and “Haven.” But he’s also now a prolific director, working on both comedies like “Working the Engels” but also sci-fi shows like “Van Helsing” and “Dark Matter.”

Now he’s back on TV as the star of “Private Eyes,” a fun, light hearted procedural mystery drama from Canada that has made its way across the border on Ion.
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Donald Trump Says “Ratings System” Needed For Movies Following Parkland School Shooting

The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) was founded in 1922 to ensure that American films had a “clean moral tone.” In 1968, they eventually established the Classification and Rating Administration, which began issuing ratings for films to help determine what films are appropriate for their children. And those ratings are quite universally known by now for anybody that goes to the movies (G, PG, PG-13. R, and Nc-17).
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