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‘First Reformed’ and ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ Anniversary Blast Off at Indie Box Office

Cinephiles in Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco and Chicago were in for a treat this weekend, as Warner Bros. brought back Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” for a limited engagement in 70mm. The re-release celebrating the epic sci-fi film’s 50th anniversary made an estimated $200,000 from four screens, leading all films this weekend with the highest per screen average of $50,000.

To oversee the mastering of the new 70mm prints, Warner Bros. brought in a filmmaker they’ve worked with for over a decade and who is a devoted fan of Kubrick: Christopher Nolan. The “Dunkirk” director led the project to create new copies of the film from Kubrick’s original negative, with no digital modifications made.

The re-release comes after a gala presentation of the film at the Cannes Film Festival and alongside a special edition of the film released on Blu-Ray.

Also Read: Is the Cannes Film Festival in Decline?
See full article at The Wrap »

Paul Schrader’s ‘First Reformed’ Is a Hit, and the ‘2001’ Reissue Finds New Box-Office Life

Paul Schrader’s ‘First Reformed’ Is a Hit, and the ‘2001’ Reissue Finds New Box-Office Life
Two very different films — Paul Schrader’s “First Reformed” and a 70mm reissue of Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” — stand out among the new releases this weekend. The first represents a critical career high for a director who made his first film 40 years ago, while the revival is from a director who died 19 years ago, and made one of the the most modern films in 1968.

Standout documentary “Rbg” joins them, but other well-reviewed films are seeing more mixed results. However, there’s enough viable titles to fill screens while Marvel gets nearly all of the theatrical attention.

Opening

First Reformed (A24) – Metacritic: 83; Festivals include: Venice, Telluride, Toronto, New York 2017

$100,270 in 4 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $25,067

Schrader has a long career as a screenwriter (“Taxi Driver”) and director (American Gigolo”), but his career has seen spotty critical and audience reception. “First Reformed,” with Ethan Hawke as a clergyman experiencing spiritual crisis,
See full article at Indiewire »

What is the “Eyes Wide Shut” Cast Up to Today?

Eyes Wide Shut’ is an erotic drama film that was co-written, directed and produced by Stanley Kubrick. This 1999 film is based on the 1926 novella ‘Traumnovelle’, which translates as ‘Dream Story’, by Arthur Schnitzel. It is about Dr. Bill Harford discovering his wife had thought about having an affair and how he then embarks on a night of sexual adventures. The film had a star-studded cast, so what are the cast of ‘Eyes Wide Shut’ up to now? 1. Tom Cruise Tom Cruise played the lead role of Dr. Bill Harford in ‘Eyes Wide Shut’ and starred his real-life

What is the “Eyes Wide Shut” Cast Up to Today?
See full article at TVovermind.com »

10 Facts About The Shining You Never Knew

10 Facts About The Shining You Never Knew
It's one of the most excruciatingly analyzed films from one of the most celebrated filmmakers of all time, adapted from a story by one of our most prolific creative minds. Stanley Kubrick's The Shining features several career-defining scenes starring the most nominated male actor in the history of the Academy Awards. Here we'll take a look at 10 things you never knew about The Shining.

Stephen King and Kubrick had just one conversation.

The Shining author says he had but one preproduction discussion with the famous director. Kubrick called him at 7 in the morning one day, asking, "I think stories of the supernatural are fundamentally optimistic, don't you? If there are ghosts then that means we survive death." King asked how hell would fit in with that notion. After a long pause, the filmmaker said, "I don't believe in hell." While King disavowed the film due to Kubrick's numerous departures from the source material,
See full article at MovieWeb »

‘Deadpool 2’ Breaks Opening Day Record for R-Rated Film

‘Deadpool 2’ Breaks Opening Day Record for R-Rated Film
Deadpool 2” broken the opening-day record for an R-rated movie with a $53.3 million debut, reclaiming the title its predecessor had held until the $50.4 million Friday debut of “It” last September.

Fox’s sequel, which was distributed to a studio-record 4,349 screens, is now on pace to match the 2016 original’s $132 million opening weekend total.

Critics and audiences loved the film as much as Wade Wilson’s first outing, giving it an 84 percent Rotten Tomatoes score and an A on CinemaScore.

Also Read: 'Deadpool 2' Director David Leitch on Overcoming Sequelitis, Franchise's Future

The $53 million start for “Deadpool 2” includes $18 million from Thursday previews, also a record for R-rated films.

This new record was fueled in good part by robust advance ticket sales. Fandango reported that sales for “Deadpool 2” on their site were outpacing that of the first “Deadpool,” while Atom Tickets reported that the sequel was now their biggest advance seller ever,
See full article at The Wrap »

Film Review: Full Glory of Cinema Art Resides in 70mm ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’

Chicago – It is the 50th Anniversary of director Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey,” and the film has lost none of its power, freshness and thought process, in a journey of truth that ponders existence. The film has been recently restored in 70mm (overseen by director Christopher Nolan) and now is on a roadshow tour, including Chicago’s historic Music Box Theatre.

Rating: 5.0/5.0

The scope of the project, which used the cutting-edge special effects of 1968, is like a fine art painting in the 70mm film format, filling the edges of the widescreen with pure and rich cinema. In that undertaking, Stanley Kubrick not only evolved his reputation as a filmmaker, but advanced the filmmaking in a way equivalent of the transition from silent film to sound. The influence of “2001” can be seen in all science fiction films afterward, including and especially “Star Wars,” and has generally inspired a generation of movie creators.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Marketing-Distribution Executive Arthur Manson Dies at 90

Marketing-Distribution Executive Arthur Manson Dies at 90
Arthur Manson, a veteran film executive whose career in marketing and distribution encompassed numerous Oscar-winning films, died May 14 at his home in Riverdale, N.Y. He was 90.

Manson worked on the marketing campaigns for “Walking Tall,” “Platoon,” “JFK,” “Hotel Rwanda,” “All the President’s Men,” “A Star Is Born,” “Shakespeare in Love,” “Cinema Paradiso,” “The Great Santini,” “Angela’s Ashes,” “The Cider House Rules,” and “Slumdog Millionaire.”

Manson was an adviser to Oliver Stone, Scott Rudin, Miramax, the Weinstein Company, Joseph E. Levine, and Stanley Kubrick. He worked for MGM, Samuel Goldwyn Productions[/link], Stanley Kramer Productions, Columbia Pictures, Dino De Laurentiis, 20th Century Fox, and Warner Bros.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Kubrick in the spotlight by Anne-Katrin Titze

Leon Vitali, who played Lord Bullingdon, on Stanley Kubrick: "We had taken a walk when we were filming. It was like a whistle-stop tour of every Stately Home in England, it seemed like, when we were filming Barry Lyndon." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In the final installment of my conversation on the afternoon of the première in New York of Tony Zierra's Filmworker, Leon Vitali reveals that Stanley Kubrick was "nuts for animals", that the ballroom used in Barry Lyndon was "full of Joshua Reynolds' and Van Dykes", and that a scene they called the "Masked Ball" was filmed in the home of Lord Carnarvon, who discovered the Tutankhamun tomb.

We speak about Kubrick, the photographer, a secret nostalgia, the casting of the twins Lisa Burns and Louise Burns for The Shining, Diane Arbus and Bruno Dumont's Jeannette, The Childhood Of Joan Of Arc.

Leon Vitali on Stanley Kubrick,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Christopher Nolan Goes Analog Route to Preserve Celluloid Beauty of ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’

Christopher Nolan Goes Analog Route to Preserve Celluloid Beauty of ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’
To filmmaker Christopher Nolan, the phrase “newly restored” has taken on unfortunate baggage. In the past decade or so, he believes, it has come to mean digital tinkering with classic films, or even “corrections” made on behalf of artists who worked in another time based on mere assumptions about their work.

So when Nolan saw a few reels struck from the original 70mm camera negative of Stanley Kubrick’s 1968 masterwork “2001: A Space Odyssey” — which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year — the gears started turning. What if audiences had access to a genius’s “unrestored” vision in all its analog glory? Furthermore, what if serious efforts were to be put into an increasingly antiquated type of celluloid rehabilitation, one free of the digital realm?

“A lot of the great film-restoration work throughout history was done entirely photochemically, including the mid-1980s release of ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ that Steven Spielberg
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Filmworker Review

Leon Vitali could have had it all, fame, fortune and an army of adoring fans at his feet, but instead, the young promising actor decided to give it all up to serve for decades as Stanley Kubrick’s right-hand man on some the most iconic productions of the director’s career.

Having admired Kubrick for years, Vitali’s dreams came true when he landed a role in the master’s seminal 18th-century period piece Barry Lyndon as Lord Bullingdon, the title character’s mortal enemy. However, when the cameras stopped rolling, Vitali found himself shunning the limelight and the dozens of prestigious film and stage roles offered to him on the back of his brilliant performance in the film, deciding instead to dedicate the rest of his existence to working behind the scenes with Kubrick and remaining faithful to him until the director’s death in 1999.

In his remarkable documentary Filmworker,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Life on the street: Stanley Kubrick's early photographs of New York

Before he became a director, Kubrick spent five years as a photographer for Look magazine, which he joined in 1945 aged 17. While there, he specialised in slice-of-life picture essays that reported on the highs and lows of New York City and its inhabitants

• Through a Different Lens: Stanley Kubrick Photographs is out now from Taschen. An exhibition of his images is at the Museum of the City of New York until 28 October
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

In Focus by Anne-Katrin Titze

Leon Vitali‬ with Anne-Katrin Titze on Stanley Kubrick and the casting of Danny Lloyd for The Shining: "I could make that boy [David Morley in Barry Lyndon] focus." Photo: David Ninh

Tony Zierra's exhaustive Filmworker, which had its world première in last year's Cannes Film Festival (Christopher Nolan will present 2001: A Space Odyssey on a remastered 70mm print this year), tackles the volatile and loving relationship of the most indispensable person in Stanley Kubrick's world. Through interviews that include Matthew Modine, R Lee Ermey, and Tim Colceri on Full Metal Jacket, Marie Richardson and Lisa Leone on Eyes Wide Shut, Ryan O'Neal on Barry Lyndon, Danny Lloyd on The Shining, and executive producer Jan Harlan (nephew of Veit Harlan and brother of Christiane Kubrick) we learn about the all-encompassing role Leon Vitali ended up playing in the life of the demanding film director.

Leon Vitali as Lord Bullingdon: "As an actor,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Christopher Nolan On Why He’s ‘A Pain in the Ass to Everybody’ On His Sets — Cannes 2018

Christopher Nolan On Why He’s ‘A Pain in the Ass to Everybody’ On His Sets — Cannes 2018
As Cannes director Thierry Fremaux sought to bolster his auteur lineup this year, he brought in Martin Scorsese to open the festival with his “The Aviator” star, Cannes jury president Cate Blanchett. The New York filmmaker also introduced his Film Foundation-restored 1946 Cannes Classics entry “Enamorada,” Emilio Fernández’s Mexican revolution romance starring icon María Félix, who became a favorite of Jean Renoir and Luis Buñuel. “Black Panther” director Ryan Coogler showed his blockbuster at the Cannes outdoor cinema on the beach, and submitted to over 90 minutes of friendly grilling from American buddy Elvis Mitchell.

But the biggest crowd showed up for “Dunkirk” writer-director Christopher Nolan, who made his first foray to Cannes for a lengthy public conversation and a screening of “2001: A Space Odyssey.”

Nolan will introduce a Sunday 70mm Cannes showing of a new print of Stanley Kubrick’s movie with the director’s daughter Katharina, her uncle
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Christopher Nolan On Why He’s ‘A Pain in the Ass to Everybody’ On His Sets — Cannes 2018

Christopher Nolan On Why He’s ‘A Pain in the Ass to Everybody’ On His Sets — Cannes 2018
As Cannes director Thierry Fremaux sought to bolster his auteur lineup this year, he brought in Martin Scorsese to open the festival with his “The Aviator” star, Cannes jury president Cate Blanchett. The New York filmmaker also introduced his Film Foundation-restored 1946 Cannes Classics entry “Enamorada,” Emilio Fernández’s Mexican revolution romance starring icon María Félix, who became a favorite of Jean Renoir and Luis Buñuel. “Black Panther” director Ryan Coogler showed his blockbuster at the Cannes outdoor cinema on the beach, and submitted to over 90 minutes of friendly grilling from American buddy Elvis Mitchell.

But the biggest crowd showed up for “Dunkirk” writer-director Christopher Nolan, who made his first foray to Cannes for a lengthy public conversation and a screening of “2001: A Space Odyssey.”

Nolan will introduce a Sunday 70mm Cannes showing of a new print of Stanley Kubrick’s movie with the director’s daughter Katharina, her uncle
See full article at Indiewire »

Christopher Nolan at Cannes: 'I want the young to sit in awe at 2001: A Space Odyssey'

‘Archbishop of Analogue’ explains rationale behind new restored 70mm print of Stanley Kubrick’s classic, as well as revealing the through line between his own three Batman movies

Christopher Nolan made his first appearance at Cannes – and, in a Prestige-like twist, it was for a movie he didn’t make.

The 50th anniversary “unrestored” 70mm version of 2001: A Space Odyssey premieres here on Sunday, and a packed auditorium sat for over 90 minutes to hear the Archbishop of Analogue discuss how this miracle revival came to be. Stanley Kubrick’s daughter Katharina was in the crowd, as was 2001 star Keir Dullea and Cannes jury member (and fellow Warner Bros auteur) Denis Villeneuve.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Christopher Nolan: Villains Defined The Dark Knight Trilogy More Than Batman

Christopher Nolan: Villains Defined The Dark Knight Trilogy More Than Batman
Christopher Nolan may have left Gotham City behind. But in a wide-ranging two-hour talk at the Cannes Film Festival on Saturday, the director offered a unique take on his Dark Knight Trilogy.

“To me, each film is a different genre,” Nolan said, about the movies starring Christian Bale as Batman. “They tend to be defined by the villain.”

Nolan explained that he saw 2005’s “Batman Begins” as a straightforward origins story. “The villain (Liam Neeson’s Henri Ducard) is an appropriate adversary,” Nolan said. “He’s a mentor-turned-enemy.” Next, came the second movie in 2008 with Heath Ledger. “‘The Dark Knight’ for me was always a crime drama in the mold of a Michael Mann film. The Joker was a terrorist, an agent of chaos set loose.” Finally, in 2012’s the grand finale, “The Dark Knight Rises,” co-starring Tom Hardy, Nolan envisioned “this historical epic. Bane as a militarist foe helped that.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes: Christopher Nolan Praises Stanley Kubrick For Refusing to Play By the Rules

Cannes: Christopher Nolan Praises Stanley Kubrick For Refusing to Play By the Rules
Director Christopher Nolan was seven years old when his father first took him to see Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey on the big screen at London’s Leicester Square Theatre.

“I had this extraordinary experience of just being transported in a way I hadn’t realized was possible. The screen just opened up and I went on this incredibly journey,” he recalled Saturday as he took part in a masterclass conversation during his first visit ever to the Cannes Film Festival.

“I’m very excited to try to give a new generation of filmgoers the same experience,” he said of the plan...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Christopher Nolan on bringing the restored 2001: A Space Odyssey to Cannes

  • JoBlo
It's been a number of years since I last watched Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, but those attending the Cannes Film Festival will get the chance to view the film is all of its restored, or rather, unrestored, glory. In order to celebrate the 50th anniversary of 2001: A Space Odyssey, Christoper Nolan will be bringing a 70mm print of the film to Cannes, and it's his goal to recreate... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ Influenced Generations of Filmmakers Like Nolan, Cameron

‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ Influenced Generations of Filmmakers Like Nolan, Cameron
When Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” opened in April 1968, few in the audience understood it, though most would never admit it. All they knew was they had just seen something like they had never seen before.

The Cannes Film Festival will celebrate the 50th anniversary of “2001: A Space Odyssey” with the world premiere of an unrestored 70mm print, introduced by Christopher Nolan, May 12.

Filmmaker James Cameron was no different. At age 14, he took the film in at the Castle Theatre in Toronto — where, as in many cities, it played continuously for two years. “The word used to describe it was ‘mindblowing,’” he recalls. “It was like no cinematic journey like I’d ever seen before.”

Kubrick’s space epic hurled science fiction films far beyond the edges of the galaxy that they had inhabited up to that time. It brought a massive shift in sci-fi storytelling, as
See full article at Variety - Film News »

“It’s Kind of Heartbreaking Sometimes to See Actors Try So Hard”: Leon Vitali on the Acting Profession, Working with Stanley Kubrick, and Tony Zierra’s Doc, Filmworker

Filmworker, the title of Tony Zierra’s Cannes 2017-premiering portrait of Leon Vitali, is a term coined by the subject himself, probably still best known for his portrayal of Lord Bullingdon in Barry Lyndon. But the former British TV star, who set aside his rising career to spend three decades as Stanley Kubrick’s behind-the scenes right-hand man (and more), seems to have never fallen out of love with the acting craft. Indeed, chatting with Kubrick’s actors’ coach/location scout/sound engineer/marketer — and current film restorer — one gets the sense that every role Kubrick tasked Vitali with was just that, a new […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »
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